Myall creek mascarre

They rode up to the station huts beside which were camped a group of approximately thirty-five Aboriginal people.

Myall creek mascarre

Myall Creek Massacre Causes and Consequences of Colonial Conflict Why was there conflict between colonists and Aborigines and how did it shape the type of values that developed in Australia? The Myall Creek Massacre of provides an insight into such questions.

Historic background

This was a massacre in which a landowner of the district led a party of 11 assigned Convicts in the slaughter of around 28 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men who had been invited to work on a neighbouring property. The 11 Convicts did not deny Myall creek mascarre murders.

Seven were later re-tried, found guilty and executed.

Myall creek mascarre

A warrant was issued for the landowner who led the group but it was not acted on and he was never tried. The decision not to bring the ring leader to trial was perhaps a strategic decision to frame the massacre as the actions of low class Convicts rather than something the respectable members of society would participate in.

Contrary to popular myth, the massacre showed that conflict did not always occur due to competition over scarce resources. If anything, the co-operative conduct between Aborigines and some landowners in the lead-up to the massacre showed that colonisation had the potential to realise mutually beneficial outcomes.

Furthermore, considering that one of the murderers was a former black slave of African descentracism was not an easy explanation for the motivations of the party. At the very least, describing it as a white on black massacre is a misleading label in that the other men rode with a black man and presumably saw him as one of their own.

Just as the reasons for the conflict undermine some populist myths, so did the public reaction and long term consequences. Some of these myths propose that the execution of the seven Convicts did nothing to stop Aboriginal massacres and instead merely pushed them underground.

While that might have been the case, that would also mean that there would be few public records for historians to base such claims on.

In other words, to say the massacres continued is unsubstantiated guesswork.

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A more likely explanation is that the executions redefined public morality. By prosecuting Convicts and emphasizing their criminal status, the judgement portrayed racism against Aborigines as something associated with low class Australians.

This redefined public morality amongst the upper class Australians that had previously openly exhibited extremely racist attitudes. Furthermore, status was associated with those white colonists who defined themselves as Aboriginal champions.

This redefinition of status could be seen in the personal journey of Richard Windeyer, the lawyer who freely represented the Convicts knowing that they were guilty. Four years after the men were sentenced to death, Windeyer had a key role in the establishment of the NSW Aboriginal Protection Society.

Contemporary obituaries usually define Richard Windeyer as a humanitarian who saw the disadvantage that Aborigines suffered in the Myall Creek trials and decided to help them. In truth, he took money from landowners who wanted Aborigines dead to defend the Myall Creek murderers.

Ironically, the white washing of his biography perhaps indicates how the trial of the Myall Creek murderers changed attitudes to Aborigines. Specifically, he went from someone who was celebrated for defending colonists who killed Aborigines to someone who portrayed himself as the great Aboriginal protector.

Myall creek mascarre

He then took the Convicts to the Myall Creek station with the intention of killing all the Aborigines of the Wirrayaraay group that were camping there. Other than gratification in killing, Fleming had no reason to harm the Aborigines. Those at the Myall Creek Station had English nick names and the children could speak a degree of English which indicated that they had formed relations with other settlers in the area.

Furthermore, they were employed by a neighbouring property and had been specifically invited to Myall Creek by a Convict stockmen, Charles Kilmeister, who was friends with them. When the Wirrayaraay men were away from the camp for work, Fleming and his Convicts arrived at Myall Creek.The Myall Creek massacre near Gwydir River, in the central New South Wales district of Namoi, involved the killing of up to 30 unarmed Indigenous Australians by ten white Europeans and one black African on 10 June at the Myall Creek near Bingara in northern New South plombier-nemours.com: 10 June The Myall Creek massacre near Gwydir River, in the central New South Wales district of Namoi, involved the killing of up to 30 unarmed Indigenous Australians by ten white Europeans and one black African on 10 June at the Myall Creek near Bingara in northern New South Wales.

After two Target: Australian Aborigines. The Myall Creek Massacre of provides an insight into such questions. This was a massacre in which a landowner of the district led a party of 11 assigned Convicts in the slaughter of around 28 Aboriginal women, children and elderly men who had been invited to work on a neighbouring property.

Myall Creek Massacre and Memorial Site is the heritage-listed site of and memorial for the victims of the Myall Creek massacre at Bingara Delungra Road, Myall . The Myall Creek Massacre memorial is situated in northern NSW between the towns of Bingara and Delungra.

From Sydney travel north to Newcastle then on highway number 15 to Tamworth. Continue north via Manilla and Barraba to Bingara. Myall Creek Massacre On June 10, , the infamous Myall Creek Massacre took place at Myall Creek Station where twenty eight Aboriginal men, women and .

Myall Creek Massacre and Memorial Site - Wikipedia